Calendar

  1. Starting Line: Readers, Organization, and Ethics Week of August 24

    Assigned Work

    To Read
    1. Course policies, calendar, and brief project descriptions
    2. Technical Editing, 5th ed. (TE5): Ch. 1, 2, 17, and 21
    To Do
    1. Complete the COM425/529 Contract and Survey (check your @hawk.iit.edu email); please do this as soon as possible
    2. Sign up for a Basecamp account (invite will arrive at your preferred account, after you’ve completed the Contract and Survey); also do this as soon as possible
    3. Introduce yourself to the class in the Basecamp “Virtual Introductions” discussion thread (after you get your Basecamp invite)
    4. Sign up for a GitHub account if you don't have one, and post a hello in our asynchronous chat room
  2. Working with Writers, Managing Projects Week of August 31

    Deliverables Due

    1. An introduction of yourself posted in the Basecamp “Virtual Introductions” discussion thread

    Assigned Work

    To Read
    1. TE5: Ch. 3, 4 & 7
    2. The Subversive Copy Editor (SCE): Ch. 1 & 5
    To Do
    1. Respond to one of the situations (a.-e.) on pages 40-41 in TE5 in a post in the discussion thread “Working with Writers” in Basecamp; enrich your response by drawing on material from SCE
    2. Respond to another student’s response to one of those situations, also in the Basecamp thread
    3. Sign up for a Dropbox account if you don't have one
    4. Editing Exercise #1 (PDF of exercise posted in Basecamp; email instructor with a Dropbox share link to your marked-up copy of the PDF)
  3. Traditional Marking & Copyediting Basics Week of September 7

    Deliverables Due

    1. Respond to one of the situations (a.-e.) on pages 40-41 in TE5 in a post in the discussion thread “Working with Writers” in Basecamp; enrich your response by drawing on material from SCE
    2. Respond to another student’s response to one of those situations, also in the Basecamp thread
    3. Sign up for a Dropbox account if you don't have one
    4. Editing Exercise #1 (PDF of exercise posted in Basecamp; email instructor with a Dropbox share link to your marked-up copy of the PDF)

    Assigned Work

    To Read
    1. News and Announcements
    2. Full Project 1 Description (below)
    3. TE5: Ch. 6, 8, 9 & 10
    To Do
    1. Discuss on Basecamp the resume to be edited on page 107 of TE5; you may wish to edit the copy first, but the discussion should be about the edits you’d make, and why (not just a list of edits)
    2. Editing Exercise #2 (PDF on Basecamp; email instructor with Dropbox link to your work)
    3. Select your copy to edit for Project 1; create a PDF of the unedited copy and email to instructor as soon as possible
  4. Mechanics Week of September 14

    Deliverables Due

    1. Discuss on Basecamp the resume to be edited on page 107 of TE5; you may wish to edit the copy first, but the discussion should be about the edits you’d make, and why (not just a list of edits)
    2. Editing Exercise #2 (PDF on Basecamp; email instructor with Dropbox link to your work)
    3. Select your copy to edit for Project 1; create a PDF of the unedited copy and email to instructor as soon as possible

    Assigned Work

    To Read
    1. TE5: Ch. 11 & 23
    To Do
    1. Finish Project 1 marking; project due Sept. 25
  5. Grammar and Usage I Week of September 21

    Deliverables Due

    1. Project 1 due at noon CDT on Friday, Sept. 25

    Assigned Work

    To Read
    1. Chicago Manual of Style, 16th ed. (CMS16): Ch. 5, “Grammar and Usage” by Bryan A. Garner
    2. TE5: Ch. 10
    To Do
    1. Discussion & Application exercises 1-7 in Chapter 10 of TE5; send as an email to the instructor (just type your responses into the body of the email)
    2. Contribute to the Trouble with Grammar discussion thread on Basecamp (instructions in the instructor's first post)
  6. Grammar and Usage II Week of September 28

    Deliverables Due

    1. Discussion & Application exercises 1-7 in Chapter 10 of TE5; send as an email to the instructor (just type your responses into the body of the email)
    2. Contribute to the Trouble with Grammar discussion thread on Basecamp (instructions in the instructor's first post)

    Assigned Work

    To Read
    1. Project 2 Description
    2. CMS16: Ch. 5, “Word Usage” section and glossary of problematic words (if not already read last week)
    3. CMS16: Ch. 6-10; read Overview sections of all chapters. Skim remainder of each chapter to gain familiarity with its contents.
    4. TE5: Ch. 9
    To Do
    1. Email instructor with your manuscript of choice to edit for Project 2
    2. Editing Exercise #3 (PDF on Basecamp; email instructor with Dropbox link to your work)
    3. Contribute to the Trouble with Usage discussion thread on Basecamp (instructions in the instructor’s first post)
  7. Style Manuals I: Manuscript Preparation Week of October 5

    Deliverables Due

    1. Email instructor with your manuscript of choice to edit for Project 2
    2. Editing Exercise #3 (PDF on Basecamp; email instructor with Dropbox link to your work)
    3. Contribute to the Trouble with Usage discussion thread on Basecamp (instructions in the instructor’s first post)

    Assigned Work

    To Read
    1. The Subversive Copy Editor (SCE): Ch. 3, 4, & 6
    2. CMS16: Ch. 2
    To Do
    1. Locate an academic journal in your field of study, and find its instructions for manuscript preparation. Post a link to Basecamp that summarizes the journal’s requirements, and the ways in which it differs from the Chicago Manual of Style.
  8. Style Manuals II: Documentation Week of October 12

    Deliverables Due Wednesday, October 14 (because Fall Break)

    1. Locate an academic journal in your field of study, and find its instructions for manuscript preparation. Post a link to Basecamp that summarizes the journal’s requirements, and the ways in which it differs from the Chicago Manual of Style.

    Assigned Work

    To Read
    1. CMS16: Ch. 14, sections 14.1-43, 14.56-67 (skim all remaining sections) & Ch. 15, sections 15.1-15.19 (skim all remaining sections)
    2. SCE: Ch. 7 & 8
    To Do
    1. Locate a Wikipedia article with a Bibliography (that's different from the Notes and references section; see this entry on Terry Thomas for a Wikipedia bibliography example) that has at least 10 sources, including books and print articles. Take 10 of the sources, and write each source according to 1) CMS Note Style; 2) CMS Bibliography Style; and 3) CMS Author-Date Reference List Style. Email to instructor. Additional notes on Basecamp.
  9. Proofreading Week of October 19

    Deliverables Due

    1. Ten sources from Wikipedia article Bibliography, rewritten according to 1) CMS Note Style; 2) CMS Bibliography Style; and 3) CMS Author-Date Reference List Style.

    Assigned Work

    To Read
    1. CMS16: Ch. 2.97-2.136
    2. TE5: Ch. 13
    3. Butterick, Practical Typography: “Typography in Ten Minutes,” “Summary of Key Rules,” “Type Composition” (all sections)
    To Do
    1. Email instructor with your chosen article for Project 2 ASAP, if you haven’t already done so
    2. Editing Exercise #4 (actually a proof-reading exercise; PDF of exercise posted in Basecamp; email instructor with the Dropbox link to your marked-up copy of the PDF)
  10. Work Week Week of October 26

    Deliverables Due

    1. Email instructor with your chosen article for Project 2 ASAP, if you haven’t already done so
    2. Editing Exercise #4 (actually a proof-reading exercise; PDF of exercise posted in Basecamp; email instructor with the Dropbox link to your marked-up copy of the PDF)

    Assigned Work

    To Do
    1. Contribute to the Basecamp discussion on Project 2 style sheets
    2. Finish Project 2
    To Read
    1. TE5: Ch. 24
  11. Comprehensive Editing: Style & Organization Week of November 2

    Deliverables Due

    1. Contribute to the Basecamp discussion on Project 2 style sheets

    Assigned Work

    To Read
    1. TE5: Ch. 14, 15, 16, & 17
    To Do
    1. Project 2 Due Friday, November 6 at Noon
    2. Contribute to the Basecamp discussion on Project 2 style sheets
    3. Edit the paragraph in Discussion & Application #4 on page 230 of TE5, according to the prompt in #5 (specify which agent you’ve chosen) and post in the Comprehensive Editing for Style discussion thread on Basecamp; respond to at least one other student’s edit based on the questions in #6 (pp. 320-231).
  12. Comprehensive Editing: Design & Illustration Week of November 9

    Deliverables Due

    1. Edit the paragraph in Discussion & Application #4 on page 230 of TE5, according to the prompt in #5 (specify which agent you’ve chosen) and post in the Comprehensive Editing for Style discussion thread on Basecamp; respond to at least one other student’s edit based on the questions in #6 (pp. 320-231).

    Assigned Work

    To Read
    1. Project 3 description
    2. CMS16: Ch. 3
    3. TE5: Ch. 18 & 19
    4. SCE: Ch. 2 & 9
    5. Butterick, Practical Typography: “Times New Roman,” “Font Recommendations,” “Page Layout,” and “Sample Documents” (all sections for all chapters)
    To Do
    1. Email the instructor with your plans to work individually or with a partner on Project 3. The partner should be CC’d on your email, if you’re choosing that option (only one of you needs to email).
  13. Editing for Global Contexts & Internationalization Week of November 16

    Deliverables Due

    1. Project 3 plans (team or individual)

    Assigned Work

    To Read
    1. TE5: Ch. 20
    2. CMS16: Ch. 11 (11.1-11.13; skim remainder for familiarity)
    To Do
    1. Take roughly 300 words of copy from anywhere in your software project’s website for Project 3 (if you’re working with a partner, each of you should choose a different piece of copy; coordinate that yourselves) and use it to complete Discussion & Application question 1 from TE5 (p. 316; use the copy from the website instead of one of your own papers). Post to this Basecamp thread, with a link to the page where the copy originated.

    Thanksgiving Break/Work Week Week of November 23

  14. Work Week Week of November 30

    Deliverables Due

    1. Discussion & Application question 1 from TE5 (p. 316; use about 300 words of copy from your Project 3 proejct’s website instead of one of your own papers). Post to this Basecamp thread, along with a link to the page where the copy originated.

    Assigned Work

    To Do
    1. By Friday, December 4, email the instructor with questions that you have about your work on Project 3.
    2. Project 3 due to instructor by 5:00pm on Wednesday, December 9.
  15. Finals Week Week of December 7

    • Final project (Project 3) due to instructor by 5:00pm on Wednesday, December 9

Projects

Project 3: Comprehensive Editing of Technical Manuals Due December 9

For this project, the instructor will assign you an open-source software project’s Web-based technical manual and project website, both of which you will comprehensively edit. You will also create a short in-house style guide for the software project’s manual and promotional website. You have the option of working individually or in groups of two or three for this project.

Project Goals

  • Learn to apply principles of comprehensive editing, including style, organization, and visual design
  • Learn to comprehensively edit for internationalization and global contexts, as represented by open-source software projects
  • Learn to work with complex, technical material that may be beyond your comprehension, and edit it for professional audiences (the manual) and non-technical audiences (the promotional website)

Deliverables & Milestones

  1. Decide whether to work on this project individually, or with another student; students should email the instructor with their preference by Friday, November 13. Instructor will then assign an open-source project to each group or individual student.
  2. A content audit of all of a project's technical manual pages, and its accompanying website; present this as a table or a style sheet that lists URLs, page titles, and a one-sentence content summary.
  3. Twelve comprehensively edited pages of a project’s technical manual
  4. Six comprehensively edited pages of a project’s website
  5. An in-house style manual for the software project, presented as a PDF, that includes illustrative screenshots from the project’s materials as well as improved examples resulting from your comprehensive editing. The manual should cover language usage and style, as well as typography/visual-design styles. Tip: create another style sheet, as you did in Project 2, and use that as your first draft of the style manual.
  6. A self-critique memo that evaluates your project and your progress in the class for this semester (2-3 paragraphs; submit via email; students working in groups will each submit their own memo, and also evaluate the contributions to the project by others in the group)

Project 4 (COM529 Only): Special Project Due December 9

COM529 students will work with the instructor to determine a project that presents additional editing challenges and relates in some way to the publishing industry.

Completed Projects

Project 1: Basic Marking and Copyediting Due September 25

For your first project, you will choose from among the Wikipedia articles identified during August 2015 as needing copyediting. You may choose any article to copyedit, so long as it:

  • provides coverage of a non-technical topic (e.g., the entry for James Beard would be a non-technical example, versus the entry for Electrocochleography)
  • is at least 1500 words, not including references (copy and paste the main text into a word processor to get a rough word count)

You will create a PDF of the copy, and mark it using the basic editorial symbols covered in Chapter 4 of Rude and Eaton.

Project Goals

  • Learn to create markable copy from Web pages
  • Effectively use editorial symbols outlined in Rude and Eaton for marking copy
  • Learn to edit non-technical copy with a general audience in mind
  • Follow the guidance of an in-house style manual (in this case, Wikipedia's Manual of Style)

Requirements

Your selected article must:
  • cover a non-technical topic
  • have running copy of approximately 1500-2000 words
Your copy for marking should be:
  • Prepared in PDF format. One way to do this is to install the Readability plugin for your desktop browser of choice, and print to PDF from the resulting Readability rendering of your chosen article. (Although Wikipedia provides the ability to download PDFs of their articles, you should learn to create copyediting-friendly PDFs from any website, using your own tools.)
  • Sent as a Dropbox link in raw unedited form to the instructor immediately upon your choosing the article. No two students are permitted to mark the same article, so email the instructor with your choice as soon as possible.
  • Printed and marked with a pen or pencil and scanned, or marked digitally with drawing tools that allow you to create the marks described in Chapter 4 of Rude and Eaton.
  • Marked according to the Wikipedia Manual of Style
  • Submitted to the instructor in final, marked form as a Dropbox link to the PDF

Deliverables & Milestones

  1. An email with a Dropbox link to your unedited article in PDF format (see suggested process in the Requirements section above), submitted to the instructor as soon as possible. Due ASAP.
  2. An email with a Dropbox link to your edited article, in PDF format (marked on paper and photographed/scanned, or marked digitally using drawing tools in a PDF program). Due Sept. 25
  3. A self-critique memo that evaluates your project, your use of the Wikipedia Manual of Style on your chosen article, and your progress in the class to this point (2-3 paragraphs; submit in the email containing your Dropbox link to the final edited copy). Due Sept. 25
  4. Bonus points for submitting your work to Wikipedia; email instructor with the URL(s) that point to your changes to the article on en.wikipedia.org. Optional; due Sept. 25

Project 2: Editing for Academic Publication Due November 6

Project 2 prepares you to edit manuscripts for academic publication. Choose an article manuscript from the Social Sciences Research Network (SSRN) Research Papers Series. You can choose a manuscript from any of the SSRN’s subject areas, but it must be listed as appearing in a “Working Paper Series” (see for example this list for economics manuscripts; what you cannot choose is a paper in the “Accepted Paper Series”). You are responsible for editing the first 4000 words of the manuscript and the first 20 entries of its bibliography/reference list. Refer to The Chicago Manual of Style for all matters of grammar and usage, as well as for citation style and formatting.

While you will of course be working on sentence-level edits, keep in mind also issues of style, clarity, and the consistency and overall organization of the manuscript. Query the author frequently; academics are a special breed when it comes to feeling protective of their writing.

Project Goals

  • Learn to mark up copy intended for academic publication, including working with academic authors
  • Apply The Chicago Manual of Style to all grammar, usage, and citation issues
  • Prepare an article’s reference list according to The Chicago Manual of Style
  • Learn to utilize your network of peers (people in this class) and the instructor to discuss problems in the manuscript and ways to address them

Requirements

Your chosen article must:
  • Have at least 4000 words of body copy, including any figure/image captions but NOT including any extended equations or data tables
  • Have at least 20 items in the reference list/bibliography/works cited page
Your edited copy must:
  • Be marked up for grammar and usage, with many author queries and suggestions for substantive, global revisions (major cuts, reorganization, etc.)
  • Have an amended a bibliography of 20 items that follows either the CMS Bibliography or Author-Date Reference-list style; DO NOT just mark the bibliography items. Prepare a fresh bibliography in your word processor of choice.

Deliverables & Milestones

  1. A URL to your chosen article’s download page on SSRN, emailed to the instructor for approval. Due October 5.
  2. Interaction with instructor and course colleagues on Basecamp, Gitter.im, email, etc. as you work through your manuscript and encounter questions and problems that would benefit from others’ insights.
  3. A PDF cover letter of no more than 1-2 pages addressed to the article’s author(s) explaining the editing work that you have done. It should prepare them to understand the changes you have suggested, and alert them to global/repeated queries that require internal consistency throughout the manuscript. Due November 6.
  4. A PDF of the style sheet that you create as you work through the manuscript to ensure its internal consistency. For example, your style sheet might include hyphenation issues (e.g., re-create, not recreate), spelling (especially of non-English and transliterated words and proper names, e.g., Lev Semyonovich Vygotsky, not Lev Semyonovich Vygodsky), and other issues that aren't necessarily right or wrong, but should simply be consistent throughout. The style sheet serves two purposes: first, it should help you to ensure internal consistency within the manuscript. Individual entries in your style sheet should follow (or, when it's in the best interests of readers, deviate from) the Chicago Manual of Style. Second, the style sheet should be comprehensible and useful for the author as well as anyone else involved in handling the manuscript through to publication. Be organized, be explicit, and of course, be consistent. Due November 6.
  5. A PDF of your marked-up article. In-text citation should match either the Bibliography or Author-Date style (hint: if the unedited manuscript uses a date-style system, use author-date). Due November 6.
  6. A PDF of the article’s first twenty references prepared as a CMS-style Bibliography or Author-Date Reference List. Due November 6.
  7. A self-critique memo that evaluates your project and your progress in the class to this point (2-3 paragraphs; submit via email). Your self-critique email should include a Dropbox link to a folder containing all of the PDF deliverables listed above. Due November 6.

Instructor

Prof. Karl Stolley

  • karl.stolley@gmail.com
  • @karlstolley on Twitter
  • karl.stolley on Skype
  • Office hours via Skype (karl.stolley) or GChat (karl.stolley@gmail.com) on Tuesdays, 4pm to 5pm & by appointment or chance (I’m signed into GChat most of the time)

Policies

Course Description

This course covers the theory, principles, and intensive practice of various forms of editing, including basic copyediting, comprehensive editing, and proofreading. The course includes broad coverage of grammar and mechanics, usage and style, and the rhetorical dimensions of dictionaries, style guides/manuals, and other reference works. The course covers the traditional symbols for editorial marks on paper or paper-like copy (e.g., PDFs), but also offers a look at the use of wikis and version control for handling the editing of born-digital writing.

Technical editing is just one of many professional activities that occurs almost exclusively in a remote, digital setting. The online nature of this course emphasizes and reflects the importance of learning to work remotely. As an online course, Technical Editing is meant to be more than an opportunity for students to learn while wearing pajamas. Students will learn to collaborate and communicate effectively in a remote, digitally mediated environment for individual and group projects.

  1. Course Goals

    • Develop proficiency in basic copyediting, comprehensive editing, and proofreading
    • Learn to read and write traditional editorial symbols for marking paper or paper-like copy
    • Gain familiarity with wikis, version control systems, and other born-digital means of editing collaborative writing
    • Understand and apply a rhetorically grounded approach to grammar and mechanics
    • Understand and apply rhetorical approaches to language usage and style
    • Develop an awareness of the ethical and legal issues surrounding the editing of technical writing
    • Learn effective strategies for remote work, using software tools such as group and one-on-one chats, file sharing services, discussion boards, and project management software
    • Apply course concepts and adjust/extend course projects to fit your own academic and professional interests
  2. Materials and Technologies

    Required Texts

    • Rude, Carolyn and Angela Eaton. Technical Editing. 5th ed. Boston: Longman, 2011.
    • Saller, Carol Fisher. The Subversive Copy Editor: Advice from Chicago. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2009.
    • University of Chicago Press. The Chicago Manual of Style. 16th ed. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2010. (A subscription to The Chicago Manual of Style Online is also acceptable.)
    • Required for 529/Strongly recommended for 425: Garner, Bryan A. Garner’s Modern American Usage. 3rd ed. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009.
    • Other electronic books, articles, and materials linked to from the course calendar and/or distributed by other electronic means.

    Required Technologies

    • An email account that you check regularly
    • A Dropbox account
    • A Basecamp account (invite will arrive via email)
    • A GitHub account (see note about anonymity in the course technology policy below)
    • A PDF reader capable of marking up documents

    Recommended Technologies

    • A computer or smartphone with a camera, for video chatting with the instructor and other students
  3. Grading Policy: COM425 Students

    • Project 1: 15pts
    • Project 2: 25pts
    • Project 3: 30pts
    • Weekly Assignments (total): 30pts
    • TOTAL: 100pts

    A = 90+ pts; B = 80-89pts; C = 70-79pts; D = 60-69pts; E =< 59 pts

    Grading Criteria

    • A - Student has turned in all required components of a project, the work is exceptional in quality, and reflects the student’s dedication to adjusting the project to his or her own interests.
    • B - Student has turned in all required components of a project, and the work is exceptional for undergraduate work.
    • C - Student has turned in all required components of a project and submitted work that is acceptable as undergraduate level.
    • D - Student has turned in all required components of a project, but the work is below undergraduate level.
    • E - Student has not turned in all required components of a project.
  4. Grading Policy: COM529 Students

    • Project 1: 15pts
    • Project 2: 25pts
    • Project 3: 30pts
    • Project 4: 15pts
    • Weekly Assignments (total): 15pts
    • TOTAL: 100pts

    A = 90+ pts; B= 80-89pts; C=70-79pts; E =< 69 pts

    Grading Criteria

    • A - Student has turned in all required components of a project, the work is exceptional in quality, and reflects the student's dedication to adjusting the project to his or her own interests.
    • B - Student has turned in all required components of a project and submitted work that is acceptable as graduate level.
    • C - Student has turned in all required components of a project, but the work is below graduate level.
    • E - Student has not turned in all required components of a project.
  5. Course Technology Policy

    Because technology is an essential part of contemporary editing as well as online learning, proficiency and skill with technology is essential to your success in this class. Difficulty with technology is not an acceptable excuse for being unprepared for class.

    If you are having trouble with technology or any other material covered in this course, it is your professional responsibility to do research beyond the resources and guidance provided in class and find materials that work for you. I also encourage all students to meet with me during my office hours or at another arranged time. I prefer that you contact me via email or GChat well in advance of assignment and project deadlines.

    All of that being said, I am committed to providing the most accessible online course I possibly can. I have gone to great lengths to make the course website accessible on mobile and desktop devices, for screen readers, etc. I have also chosen services for video, collaboration, and so on that I believe to be mobile friendly. If you should find that any aspect of the course is not working on your phone/tablet/computer, please contact me immediately via email.

    Finally, I have asked you to sign up for a GitHub account for this class. Note that GitHub accounts are public, as are most social-type accounts. To protect your privacy you are certainly allowed to use a pseudonym/alias for GitHub and any other account. At the same time, you might want to think about how establishing GitHub and other accounts under your own name, in cases where you conduct yourself professionally, might actually be an asset to your online presence, and the results that future schools or employers turn up when they search for you on Google and elsewhere.

  6. Weekly Assignments and Electronic Discussion

    Your timely submission of deliverables and active participation in the electronic discussions for this class are required both for your own success and for the success of the class as a whole. However, if you absolutely must miss a discussion or be late with a weekly deliverable, please contact me ahead of time via email.

  7. Academic Honesty

    As with any course at IIT, you are expected to uphold the Code of Academic Honesty as described in the IIT Student Handbook). All work for this course must be your own original effort, including print and digital page design and computer code. Summarizations and quotations of text, as well as any use of open-source code libraries and images not of your own making, should be clearly cited as legally and ethically warranted and rhetorically appropriate. Access, storage, dissemination, and other use of data from third-party sources must conform to the source’s terms of service, licensing, and other relevant legal and ethical restrictions.

    If you are at all uncertain as to whether you are submitting work that in whole or in part may violate the Code of Academic Honesty, please contact me immediately and before the work is due. The consequences of academic dishonesty are severe. Any student who violates the Code of Academic Honesty will be subject to expulsion from this course with a failing grade, and I will report the student to the Chair of the Department of Humanities, who may take additional disciplinary action, including reporting violations to the relevant offices of Undergraduate or Graduate Academic Affairs.

  8. Special Needs Statement

    Reasonable accommodations will be made for students with documented disabilities. In order to receive accommodations, students must obtain a letter of accommodation from the Center for Disability Resources. The Center for Disability Resources is located in IIT Tower, 3424 S. State Street - 1C3-2 (on the first floor). Contact the Center by telephone at 312-567-5744, by TDD at 312-567-5135, or via email at disabilities@iit.edu

    Students who have any difficulty (either permanent or temporary) that might affect their ability to perform in class should contact me privately, either in person or via email, at the start of the semester or as a documented difficulty arises. Methods, materials, or deadlines will be adapted as necessary to ensure equitable participation for all students.